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Indo-Dutch Satay

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Indo-Dutch Satay

Satay serving suggestion

Photo © Ellen Schelkers
Indonesian satay has become so entrenched in Dutch food culture that it’s now seen as near-native. Not only is pork and chicken satay a very popular home-cooked meal, but you’ll find the Dutch snacking on take-away fries with satay sauce too. Talk about fusion!

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb pork tenderloin (500 g)
  • 1/2 inch fresh ginger (about 1 cm), finely grated
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely grated
  • 6 tbsp ketjap manis (or soy sauce)
  • 2 tbsp sunflower oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chunky peanut butter (90 g)
  • 1/4 cup candle nuts (30 g), ground finely in a food processor
  • 1/2 cup coconut milk (120 ml)
  • 1 stalk of lemongrass, bruised
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 1 tbsp sambal (or chile paste)
  • ----------------------------------------------------
  • Extra:
  • Sate sticks

Preparation:

For the marinade: Cut the pork into bite sized squares and place in a freezer bag, along with half of both the ginger and garlic, 3 tablespoons of the ketjap manis and 1 tablespoon of the oil. Knot the bag, massage the marinade into the meat, and leave to marinade in the fridge overnight or for a few hours.

For the satay sauce: Fry the onion in the remaining tablespoon of oil in a saucepan. Once the onion has caramelized, add the rest of the ginger and garlic, the peanut butter and the ground candle nuts. Add the rest of the ketjap manis, the coconut milk, the lemongrass and the lime leaves, and bring to a simmer for 10 minutes. Now add the sambal and taste for seasoning. If the sauce has thickened too much at this point, add some warm water. Fish out the lemongrass and lime leaves and give it a quick whisk before serving.

For the grilled meat: Thread the pork onto the satay sticks. It is now ready to barbeque or grill. If you don’t have access to a barbeque, heat a griddle pan and grill the meat for about 8 minutes, turning regularly. Do not oil the pan. Top the meat skewers with the satay sauce and serve with fluffy white rice, a cucumber salad and crunchy prawn crackers. It’s very Dutch to serve satay with thick cut fries, and I rather love this combination. Of course, you can also make mini satays and serve them as an appetizer.

TIPS:

If you’re going to barbecue the meat, soak the sate sticks in water for a few hours or overnight. This will prevent them from catching fire.

If you can’t find ketjap manis or candle nuts (available at most stores selling South East Asian ingredients) simply use regular soy sauce and a teaspoon of sugar or regular roasted peanuts.

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